Top Task Websites… 9 of the Best in Higher Education

Websites gain marketing advantage with top task design
The secret to making your website an effective marketing tool: clean and simple design that lets visitors complete their tasks as quickly as possible. Experience on the site is more important than “stunning” hero images or other design fads.
For years now I’ve been a partner in the Customer Carewords team that promotes the use of top task research as the basis of successful website design. Carewords partners work for government agencies, private business corporations, and health care organizations as well as colleges and universities. Top task rules apply everywhere.
What are examples of effective top task use in higher education? Over my years of making Link of the Week selections I’ve often included top task examples. Now, prompted by a recent query from Anne Lutgerink at Internationalizing Education, I’m collecting here several of the best of those examples.
Key design elements: speed, task visibility, and “care” words
Three elements are key to top task design: Visibility in 5 seconds or less as a page opens and use of words that visitors care about. The rules don’t change for mobile, except that the right words are even more important.
Examples from 9 higher education websites
University of Ottawa home page. When it went online early in 2013 this page was a thing of beauty as it gave prominent display to just four topics linking to tasks: “Find a program” and “University fees” for the primary external audience and “News, events and dates” and “Search library” for faculty and current students. Since then the page has fallen victim on occasion to someone’s urge to add special events above the task links. It still remains one of the cleanest university home pages.
Victoria University home page: If you must use a carousel on your home page, don’t let it drive a key top task lower on the page. In this example, “Find a course” and “Browse for courses” links take the prime upper left position and the carousel starts to the right of the task.
East Stroudsburg University admissions page: Highlighting top tasks on an admissions page is especially challenging as the tasks change as people move through the recruitment cycle. ESU meets the challenge in a simple but effective way: divide the page into 4 recruitment cycle segments and list the tasks for each segment directly to the right. Just about perfect.
Arcadia University study abroad page. The program entry page illustrates how you can use a strong image along with a branding statement and still include just 3 “can’t miss” task words as the page opens. So simple. So clean. So seldom done. You can apply the same approach to just about any entry page.
Northern Alberta Institute of Technology academic program page: You won’t find any photos here but you will immediately see “Grad Employment Rate” and “Median Starting Salary,” two points about academic programs that are of increasing interest to potential students. Quickly following those are “Quick Facts,” “Tuition & Fees” and “Entrance Requirements.”
Williams College parents page: Open this page to find 6 images with word topics that you can scan easily to see the links to tasks for each topic. The first “Parent Resources” heading includes links to “Information for First-Year Students” and “Information for Returning Students” as well as a link to “Key Williams Contacts.” The ability to ‘find a person” is one of the most neglected top tasks on many websites.
Middlebury College department of English and American Literatures: Here is an admirable example of how to make it easy to contact your faculty. Each right-sized block for the 30 people listed includes email, phone number, and office hours. Sound simple? On many faculty website pages it isn’t.
Rochester Institute of Technology Merit Scholarships: For sure this page will win no beauty awards but it offers in a single place what is so often missing from scholarship pages: name of the award, eligibility (including in some cases specific ACT & SAT scores), amount of the award, and what to do, if anything, to apply.
University of Oregon gift options page: Alumni and other potential donors want to know what their options are for giving to areas that match their special interests. Visit here to see 9 areas of interest that start with “Schools and Colleges” and end with “Athletics.”
That’s all for now.

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